Monday, March 26, 2012

Youth Media - Arise to the Mountain

Hello!  My name is Sharon, aka dieMutti ("the mom" in German), and I am delighted to be posting on beginnings new on all the videos and media content available to us on youth.lds.org.  I have served in some sort of youth calling for the past seven years (breaking once for three months to serve in nursery, and for one month to serve as a ward missionary).  I am currently an early-morning seminary teacher and before this, I was YW president in my ward - which is how I found beginnings new!

Anyway, before I completely digress into a long, boring, drawn-out life story, let me just say that I am a big fan of utilizing media resources in the classroom!  Music, pictures, video clips can all enhance lessons and often speak to the youth in ways our words alone can not.  Which is why I love the media resources on lds.org - church-approved and produced to be current for the young women (and young men) in their lives.

I hope to share a video with you every other week, with a short summary and a review of the good and the great (and once in a while, the not-so-great).

This week?  The new one up is called "Arise to the Mountain" and was actually part of the General YW Broadcast this past Saturday.  The video depicts various young women engaged in activities that relate to the temple or will lead them to the temple while the song "Arise to the Mountain" is sung.  It fits the 2012 theme perfectly.  The song itself is beautiful, and on the video page, you can also download the mp3 or the sheet music, which I love - it would be a wonderful piece for a ward/stake YW to learn.

I originally had some mixed feelings about the video.  It shows happy young women who are striving for the goal of attending the temple, through attending meetings and girls camp, attending the temple as youth, doing family history work, etc and it shows a couple coming out of the temple after being married there.  I don't get as excited about videos like this because they really depict the ideal and seem to point to the "happily ever after" that is a temple marriage.  Even with my still somewhat limited life experience, I know that this isn't all and that no matter what choices we make, we will still struggle and go through tough times.  Even with a temple marriage.  Are the situations here building our young women up to think that if they struggle they can't have an ideal like this?  I would love to hear your thoughts.

After watching it a few more times, I allowed myself to focus on the spirit of the message instead of just the video depictions.  And with that in mind, I was uplifted and motivated - Yes! Young women and women everywhere, let's arise and be a temple-worthy and temple-attending people!  The temple does bring peace and happiness, and making choices that will allow us to be worthy to enter there will always bless our lives, even if those lives are not perfect, or don't always turn out exactly as we planned.

4 comments:

  1. I had some mixed feelings too, but like you in the end, I think they did a good job. The video does not focus on marriage as the reason for temple. It is portrayed for one brief moment. And then it is followed by a different woman, I believe, who is handing her baby to another woman. This is followed by two women doing family history. I think the idea was to show the temple as something that blesses the YW (now, and in the future) that blesses future generations (the baby) and that blesses past generations (the family history scene). Now, future, past? Maybe that was what they were getting at? Also, I liked that in each of those three brief scenes, there was always more than one woman or young woman. The bride hugs her friends, perhaps people that have supported her to get there, or people she is hoping to help get there? The baby was handed from one woman to another; we all help and love together? And there were two (young?) women doing family history as well. What message does all that send, too?

    I also liked that most of the video seemed more real and candid than ones in the past. The trio singing was actually singing in a church room to a class, not in a studio or just as background music. The girls walking to the temple were laughing, pointing, talking to each other, not just walking straight ahead in a staged, awkward way. The girls opening the doors for the others was a nice moment too - can't you see your young women doing that? They were having fun, not trying to be perfect.

    Though it had its flaws of course, those were the things I really appreciated about this video.

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  2. I also liked how all the situations were very real - situations that the girls are familiar with (camp, temple trips, family history, friends and sisters getting married, etc - showing that "arising to the mountain" is something that they can be and are doing right now. Also liked that the girls looked real, sometimes their voices were a little off key, they weren't all "models," etc.

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  3. I loved the video and felt it served it's purpose precisely - to get girls focused on being temple worthy. That is the goal of the Young Women program. That is what we all should be striving for, regardless of situation. I LOVED that it only showed one shot that was a temple wedding (it would have been desperately lacking if it hadn't shown this). I then LOVED that it focused on the temple - and not marriage. My only complaint would be (and I am bias as a return missionary) that it did not show a young woman with a missionary badge. That would have fit perfectly in the montage.

    Yes trials and difficulties come - but that is what we can address in our Sunday lessons - how to equip these girls to be prepared for whatever will come their way. The most essential tool we can give them, is to be endowed with power. I know that through all the turmoil I have been wading through since I was young, it has been the temple and my worthiness to attend, that has saved me.

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  4. Welcome to the team, dieMutti!! We're thrilled to have you aboard.

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